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2016

Floating lab drills 1.5km below sea floor to study megaquakes
New Scientist, August 25, 2016
It was one of the biggest and deadliest tsunamis in recorded history. The Boxing Day tsunami of 2004 killed a quarter of million people with waves reaching 15 metres. Now, a drilling expedition under way in the Indian Ocean hopes to uncover the secrets of large underwater earthquakes that can trigger such tsunamis. A multinational team on board the research vessel JOIDES Resolution, a “floating laboratory”, is about to collect sediment samples from 1.5 kilometres beneath the ocean floor.
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Scientists study microbes beneath ocean floor
UPI, April 8, 2016
Surprisingly, some microbes thrive beneath ocean floor, and are often found near hydrothermal vents. For the first time, scientists have studied in detail the microbial community living inside dense, rocky crust under the colder North Pond, along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The microbes were found within rock samples collected by an ocean floor observatory installed by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program in 2011. The observatory is situated on the North Pond, a small depression where sediment collects along the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.
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There’s Something Living In the Rocky Crust Beneath the Ocean Floor
Motherboard, April 7, 2016
In just about every nook, cranny, and crevice of our planet, some sort of life manages to thrive—whether it’s under an Antarctic ice sheet, in super-salty Arctic water, or in Chile’s Atacama desert, one of the driest and harshest environments in the world. A US scientist has found something living in another surprising place: in the rocky sediment deep under the Atlantic Ocean, 50 to 250 meters beneath the seafloor, which is itself under 4.5 km—that’s more than 2.7 miles—of ocean water. With no sunlight and few nutrients, not to mention extreme pressure, you won’t find fish or many other creatures that deep.
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Study Reveals First Microbial Life Buried Deep Beneath Ocean Floor
HNGN, April 7, 2016
What would seem like a barren, inhospitable environment completely devoid of light and low in oxygen is actually flourishing with life. Researchers from the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have, for the first time, described an active microbial community buried deep in cold oceanic crust at North Pond, an isolated sediment pond on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Surprisingly, little is actually known about life in the planet's dark, dense, rocky crust, as the only way to get there is by drilling through meters of sediment. Now, a team led by MBL Associate Scientist Julie Huber has delved into this buried marine biosphere to shed new light on the nature of life way down under.
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How deep does life go? MBL study describes microbial neighborhood beneath ocean floor
EurekAlert!, April 6, 2016
One of the startling discoveries about life on Earth in the past 25 years is that it can - and does - flourish beneath the ocean floor, in the planet's dark, dense, rocky crust. The only way to get there is by drilling through meters of sediment until you hit rock, so information on this ubiquitous but buried marine biosphere is still scarce. Now, a team led by MBL Associate Scientist Julie Huber has added new details to our understanding of the nature of life way down under.
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A Decades-Long Quest to Drill Into Earth’s Mantle May Soon Hit Pay Dirt
Smithsonian.com, January 25, 2016
Early in the spring of 1961, a group of geologists started drilling a hole into the seafloor off the Pacific coast of Baja California. The expedition, the first if its kind, was the initial phase of a project intended to punch through Earth’s crust and reach the underlying mantle. Little did they know that their efforts would soon be overshadowed when John F. Kennedy launched the race to the moon in May of that year.… Since the 1960s, researchers have attempted to drill into Earth′s mantle but have not yet met with success. Some efforts failed due to technical problems; others have fallen prey to various sorts of bad luck—including, as discovered after the fact, picking inopportune spots to drill. Nevertheless, those efforts have shown that the technology and expertise to drill to the mantle exists. And now the first phase of the most recent attempt to reach this important part of our planet is boring through a thin section of ocean crust in the southwestern Indian Ocean.
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Digging Deep Into the Crust of the Earth
Science Friday, January 22, 2016
In his classic tale Journey to the Center of the Earth, author Jules Verne dreamed of reaching the center of our planet through volcanic tubes. In the 1960s, scientists took up that challenge and tried to drill down into the earth’s mantle, but abandoned the project due to a lack of funding. Now, a team of scientists aboard the research vessel JOIDES Resolution is working to bore a hole deep into the Atlantis Bank in the Indian Ocean to collect samples of the crust and eventually break through into the mantle. Geologist Henry Dick, co-chief scientist of the expedition, joins Ira for an update on the progress of the project and explains what these samples could reveal about the formation of the planet.
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Evidence of large volcanic activity in the Caribbean uncovered
University of Southampton, January 14, 2016
Scientists from the University of Southampton have uncovered evidence of a previously unknown large volcanic eruption in the Caribbean Sea. By studying ash layers, known as tephras, in marine sediments they identified an eruption that took place on Guadeloupe 2.4 million years ago. The research, published in the journal Geology, indicates this eruption is the largest documented volcanic event in the region since that time.
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2015

Evidence of past volcanic activity in the Caribbean Sea
Science Codex, December 23, 2015
Reconstructing the magnitude of past volcanic eruptions is important in informing predictions about future eruptions and hazards. This is difficult to accomplish from records on land -- old eruptions are often eroded away, buried beneath later eruptions, or obscured by vegetation and soil. Most volcanoes are close to the oceans, so much of the erupted material falls into seawater and accumulates on the seafloor.
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Grains of sand hold clues to the history of Alaska’s glaciers
Appalachian State University News, December 10, 2015
Show most people a core sample from the ocean floor and they only see mud. Ellen Cowan sees a ribbon of time dating back 1 million years or more. Since 2013, Cowan, a geology professor at Appalachian State University, has been part of an international team of scientists studying climate change and earth systems in the Gulf of Alaska. Their work with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.
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Bid to drill deep inside Earth
BBC News, December 1, 2015
Scientists will set out this week to drill a hole into the Indian Ocean floor to try to get below the Earth’s crust for the first time. They want to sample rock from the planet’s mantle—its deep interior. In the process, the researchers hope to check their assumptions about the materials from which the crust itself is made.
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Quest to drill into Earth’s mantle restarts
Nature, December 1, 2015
Jules Verne would have dug this plan: drill into the sea floor, through kilometres of the planet’s rocky crust to penetrate the denser underlying mantle. It is one of geology’s classic quests, conceived almost 60 years ago, at the peak of the plate-tectonics revolution. Since then, many have attempted it and failed. But an expedition starting this month is taking up the challenge once again.
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Climate Can Grind Mountains Faster Than They Can Be Rebuilt
University of Florida News, November 23, 2015
Researchers for the first time have attempted to measure all the material leaving and entering a mountain range over more than a million years and discovered that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.
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Climate change can tear down mountains
Science Magazine, November 23, 2015
The St. Elias Mountains in Alaska are more than 5000 meters tall, testament to a tectonic plate wedged underneath the region that is driving them up like a snowplow. But the St. Elias range also contains some of the world’s largest glaciers, which inexhaustibly scour the mountains and dump sediment in the sea. Now, a new study finds that the glaciers are winning, eroding the mountains faster than they are being built. Moreover, a jump in the region’s erosion rates about a million years ago coincides with a transition to more powerful ice ages—a sign that climate change can have a larger than expected effect in tearing down mountains.
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Formation of coastal sea ice in North Pacific drives ocean circulation and climate
University of California Santa Cruz Newscenter, October 20, 2015
An unprecedented analysis of North Pacific ocean circulation over the past 1.2 million years has found that sea ice formation in coastal regions is a key driver of deep ocean circulation, influencing climate on regional and global scales. Coastal sea ice formation takes place on relatively small scales, however, and is not captured well in global climate models, according to scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who conducted the study.
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Seabed study expands Australian climate knowledge to past 50m years
The Guardian, October 2, 2015
Knowledge of Australia’s climate history has been expanded to the past 50m years, up from the past 500,000 years, via a major international scientific voyage from Fremantle to Darwin. The two-month expedition involved drilling of the seabed off the Western Australian coast for study by the JOIDES Resolution research vessel – one of the world’s largest floating scientific facilities. The International Ocean Discovery Program-led mission planned to find sediments that would show climate records to 5m years in the past but one section of seabed had a record stretching back to 50m years.
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Australian deserts are only 1.5 million years young, but monsoonal season is old, IODP study shows
ABC News, October 1, 2015
Australia’s deserts are among the youngest in the world, but monsoonal seasons in the nation's north are far more ancient, a new study of oceanic sediments has shown. The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) involved scores of scientists and crew sailing from Fremantle to Darwin and drilling into the seabed to discover more about climate change. The study has expanded knowledge of Australia's climate history to the last 50 million years, compared to less than 500,000 years, prior to the expedition.
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Ocean scientists look into the past to predict Australia's climate future
Phys.org, October 1, 2015
Has Australia’s climate always been so dry? Have the tropical reefs around Australia always been there? What will happen to Australia's climate and reefs in the future? The answers lie deep under the ocean, millions of years into the past. A group of leading international scientists have today concluded a two-month research expedition off the coast of Western Australia where they have been drilling into the seabed to gain valuable insight into our climate future. The $20 million International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Indonesian Throughflow Expedition 356 was the first ever expedition of the entire western coast of Australia to examine climatic conditions of the past five million years.
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Pound Middle brings ocean research to classroom from coast of Australia
Lincoln Public Schools, September 14, 2015
Seventh graders at Pound Middle School weren't able to board a drilling ship on a scientific ocean research project, but they brought the ocean to them via a live video conference. The JOIDES Resolution, (www.joidesresolution.org) is drilling for sediment and rock core samples off the northwest coast of Australia.
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Scientists Find Evidence of Ancient Microbial Life in Sub-Seafloor Mantle Rocks
Sci-News.com, September 1, 2015
Traces of ancient microbial communities have been found in rock samples of Earth’s mantle from a seafloor hydrothermal system that was active more than 100 million years ago during the Lower Cretaceous – the earlier of the two major divisions of the Cretaceous period – when the supercontinent Pangaea was breaking apart and the Atlantic Ocean was just about to open. This discovery, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, confirms a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor.
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Expedition to unravel coastal seafloor’s ancient secrets
Science Network Western Australia, August 3, 2015
International scientists who set sail from Fremantle today will use cutting edge technologies to peer five million years into the past to find clues about our future climate. The eight-week $20 million Indonesian Throughflow expedition, part of the International Ocean Discovery Program, will drill up to 1km into the seabed at six locations between the Houtman Abrolhos Islands (29°S) and the Rowley Shoals (18°S). The 32 scientists onboard the JOIDES Resolution research vessel will examine the drilled cores, using the sediments and fossils within to identify the age of the layers and the processes that shaped their content.
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Scientists look five million years into the past to predict Australia’s climate future
ABC News PM, July 31, 2015
Some of the world’s best science minds are in Fremantle preparing to embark on an expedition that could in a sense take them five million years back in time. An international research vessel with a crew of 125 will travel from Perth to Darwin drilling holes in the seabed. Little is known about the history of the north-west coast. It’s hoped the mission will answer some big questions about past climate conditions and help to predict the future.
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Digging deep into the past to see the future of climate change
The Conversation, July 30, 2015
When did Australia’s climate become so dry? When did tropical reefs around Australia develop? And what will happen to Australia’s climate and reefs in the future? The answer to these questions can be found by digging into the distant past. That means digging deep into the Earth’s crust, and you don’t always need to be on dry land to do that.
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Highly explosive volcanism at Galapagos
Phys.org, June 1, 2015
Eight to 16 million years ago, highly explosive volcanism occurred in the area of today's Galapagos Islands. This is shown for the first time by analyses of core samples obtained by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Jointly with colleagues from the US, Taiwan, Australia and Switzerland, volcanologists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel now present their results in the international journal Geology.
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Earth’s orbit affects the stability of Antarctica’s Eastern ice cap
Phys.org, February 3, 2015
An international research team led by the High Council for Scientific Research (CSIC in its Spanish acronym) and with the participation of the University of Granada, has found that there is a direct relation between the changes in the earth’s orbit and the stability of the Eastern ice cap of Antarctica, more specifically, on the continental fringe of Wilkes Land (East Antarctica). 29 scientists from 12 different countries participated in this study, which has been published in the journal Nature Geosciences.
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2014

Earth orbit affects the stability of Antarctica
ScienceDaily, October 28, 2014
A team led by the Higher Council for Scientific Research in Spain, has discovered that there is a direct relationship between changes in the Earth’s orbit and the stability of the East Antarctic ice cap, particularly in the continental margin of Wilkes Land (East Antarctica). more

Climate change caused by ocean, not just atmosphere
ScienceDaily, October 25, 2014
Most of the concerns about climate change have focused on the amount of greenhouse gases that have been released into the atmosphere. A new study reveals another equally important factor in regulating Earth's climate. Researchers say the major cooling of Earth and continental ice build-up in the Northern Hemisphere 2.7 million years ago coincided with a shift in the circulation of the ocean. more

The Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize
American Geophysical Union, October 16, 2014
The Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize (The Taira Prize) is given annually to one honoree in recognition of “outstanding transdisciplinary research accomplishment in ocean drilling.” Established in 2014, the Taira Prize is a partnership between the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU), and is made possible through the generous donation from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International (IODP-MI). The prize is given in honor of Dr. Asahiko Taira of the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. more

As Expedition Ends, Scientists Feel The Pressure
National Geographic, September 26, 2014
Blog by Amy West more

Pulling Secrets from Deep-sea, Drillbit-Eating Rocks
National Geographic, September 17, 2014
Blog by Amy West more

Time Warps With Seagoing Discoveries
National Geographic, September 4, 2014
Blog by Amy West more

Breaking Down Rocks in the Deep Ocean
National Geographic, August 28, 2014
Blog by Amy West more

Seafloor Research Vessel Gets Underway
National Geographic, August 12, 2014
Blog by Amy West more

Going on a Rock Cruise
National Geographic, July 18, 2014
Blog by Amy West more

Gibraltar Currents Show Proof Of Past Climate Changes
TAMUtimes, June 12, 2014
Examination of core samples extracted near the Strait of Gibraltar show definitive proof of shifts in climate change since about six million years ago, and also provide new evidence of a deep-earth tectonic pulse in the region, according to a team of international scientists that includes a Texas A&M University researcher. Carlos Alvarez Zarikian, a staff scientist of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) headquartered at Texas A&M, is one of 35 scientists from 14 countries who contributed to the project, and their work is published in the current issue of Science magazine. more

Pound students hear from UNL student, scientist working on ocean
Lincoln Public Schools News, May 9, 2014
Real Science in Real Time came to life at Pound Middle School for seventh- and eighth-grade students as Anica Brown’s science classes were able to video conference with the JOIDES Resolution (JR), an ocean drilling, core sampling science research vessel this past week. The JR does sediment core research in all of Earth’s oceans. Presently, the JR is off the coast of Japan in the Philippine Sea sampling cores in the subduction zone in the Marian Trench area. During each expedition, a crew and staff of scientists spend time at sea drilling for cores from under the ocean sea floor, taking and examining samples that verify evidence of Earth’s climate history. more

We’re drilling back in time to tell a tale of the sea
New Scientist, February 3, 2014
The rocks beneath the South China Sea may reveal how oceans first formed and yield millions of years of climate history, says geologist Jian Lin.
You are co-lead of an international project to drill for rock samples in the South China Sea. Why is that sea bed of such interest?
We want to answer questions about when it was formed, in part because it is a great analogue for the Atlantic and Indian oceans. In the Atlantic, for example, Europe and Africa are moving away from the Americas. With the South China Sea, the southern part moved away from the northern. more

Sea drilling project launches
Nature, January 21, 2014
The South China Sea is well known for its geopolitical tensions, but less is known about its many geological stresses and strains. That is set to change. On 28 January, an international team of scientists — from countries including China, the Philippines, India and the United States — is due to set sail from Hong Kong on board the research vessel JOIDES Resolution, marking the first expedition of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), formerly known as the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Its aim is to determine the age of the South China Sea, and to resolve ongoing controversy over how it formed. more

Deep-Sea Expedition Could Reveal How Continents Form
LiveScience, January 9, 2014
A deep-sea voyage to drill more than a mile below the ocean floor could solve one of Earth’s long-standing mysteries: how continents form. An oceangoing research vessel, which sets sail in March, will venture to a chain of underwater volcanoes known as the Izu-Bonin arc, which stretches 1,550 miles (2,500 kilometers) from Mount Fuji in Japan to the U.S. territory of Guam. The goal is to drill about 1.5 miles (2.4 kilometers) below the ocean floor, traveling more than 40 million years back in time to understand exactly how the beginnings of a continent underneath the volcanoes formed over time. more

2013

Expedition yields unexpected clues to ocean mysteries
The Almagest, December 10, 2013
A University of Houston (UH) geoscientist and his colleagues are revealing new discoveries about the Earth’s development, following a major international expedition that recovered the first-ever drill core from the lower crust of the Pacific Ocean. more

Rare Samples Help Piece Together the Formation of Earth’s Marine Crust
December 3, 2013
How exactly does molten rock from the Earth’s mantle form new ocean crust in the deep sea? This has long been one of the great puzzles in geochemistry and geophysics. Now, a team of researchers has studied the first significant sample of primitive rock from deep within the crust, retrieved earlier this year on board the JOIDES Resolution. The data is providing some critical answers to some basic questions, and the results are outlined in the December 1 Advance Online Publication of the journal Nature. more

Rocks reveal ocean ridge development
Phys.org, December 3, 2013
A University of Wyoming husband-and-wife research team was part of a larger group that has made the first significant recovery of layered igneous rocks from the Earth's lowest ocean crust. The discovery—found in the "Hess Deep Rift" in the Pacific Ocean—confirms a long-held belief among geologists that such rocks are a key part of the lower ocean crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. more

Texas A&M, NSF Announce Agreement For Research Ship Operations, May Total $250 Million
TAMU Times, November 22, 2013
The National Science Board has authorized the National Science Foundation to enter into a cooperative agreement with Texas A&M University to continue managing the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and operating its scientific research vessel JOIDES Resolution, considered a premier research vessel for deep-ocean drilling. The new cooperative agreement with the NSF could be as high as $250 million, with the international community contributing another $87.5 million, subject to availability of funds and continued scientific priorities. more

Breathing underwater: Evidence of microscopic life in oceanic crust
The Almagest, November 24, 2013
Although long thought to be devoid of life, the bottom of the deep ocean is now known to harbor entire ecosystems teeming with microbes. Scientists have recently documented that oxygen is disappearing from seawater circulating through deep oceanic crust, a significant first step in understanding the way life in the “deep biosphere” beneath the sea floor is able to survive and thrive. more

Measuring climate change at the sea floor
Digital Journal, October 25, 2013
Tracking the development of microbial life at the level of the sea bed has proved to be a useful indicator of climate change. A new study reveals the changing features. Scientists have studied traces of past microbial life in sediments off the coast of Peru. These fragments reveal how the microbial ecosystem under the seafloor has responded to climate change over hundreds of thousands of years. more

Researcher dodges typhoons, studies monsoons in the Japan Sea
Phys.org, October 19, 2013
William Anderson, associate professor in the Department of Earth and Environment and the Marine Sciences Program, recently spent two months aboard the research vessel JOIDES Resolution in the Pacific Ocean. Surrounded by crashing waves reaching almost 15 feet tall, Anderson and 30 other scientists dodged five major storms on their way to the Japan Sea. more

Breathing underwater: Evidence of microscopic life in oceanic crust
Space Daily, September 30, 2013
Although long thought to be devoid of life, the bottom of the deep ocean is now known to harbor entire ecosystems teeming with microbes. Scientists have recently documented that oxygen is disappearing from seawater circulating through deep oceanic crust, a significant first step in understanding the way life in the "deep biosphere" beneath the sea floor is able to survive and thrive. more

Truly Super Sized: World’s Largest Volcano Named For Texas A&M
Geosciences News, September 27, 2013
Texas Aggies like to think their school is among the world’s biggest movers and shakers, and now science has confirmed it. An oceanographer has uncovered the world’s largest volcano in the Pacific Ocean—about the size of New Mexico—and has named it for Texas A&M University. more

Deep Microbes Live Long and Slow
BBC News, September 4, 2013
Long-lived bacteria, reproducing only once every 10,000 years, have been found in rocks 2.5 km (1.5 miles) below the ocean floor that are as much as 100 million years old. Viruses and fungi have also been found. The discoveries raise questions about how life persists in such extreme conditions. Scientists from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program have announced the findings at the Goldschmidt conference, a meeting of more than 4,000 geochemists, in Florence, Italy. more

Sea-floor drilling tool could unlock mysteries of gas hydrates
Victoria Times Colonist, May 10, 2013
Later this month, Kate Moran will send her million-dollar baby to the bottom of the ocean. After nine years of design work, funding applications, tests and more tests, a scientific instrument that Moran invented will be pushed into the sediment 300 metres below the sea floor, 1,250 metres below sea level. “We’re going to Bullseye Vent, where gas hydrates are coming out of the water column,” Moran, president of the University of Victoria’s Ocean Networks Canada, said Friday as she reacquainted herself with equipment on the research drill vessel JOIDES Resolution, now tied up at Ogden Point. more

A Hidden Victim of Somali Pirates: Science
National Geographic, April 25, 2013
During 32 years of fieldwork in the deserts of Ethiopia, Tim White, the eminent American paleoanthropologist, has brazened through every conceivable obstacle to his research into human origins. ... “No question, it’s been a serious setback,” says White, who has waited years, in vain, for a research vessel to drill crucial seabed cores off Somalia that would revolutionize the dating of East Africa’s spectacular hominid finds. “Piracy has stopped oceanographic work in the region. There’s been no data coming out of this area for years. Zero.” more

Emergence Of Antarctic Ecosystem Triggered Rapid Biological Evolution
RedOrbit.com, April 19, 2013
The development of the sea-ice ecosystem in the circum-Antarctic Southern Ocean may have triggered further adaptation and evolution of larger organisms such as baleen whales and penguins, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science. The area’s ecosystem can be traced back to the emergence of the Antarctic ice sheets some 33.6 million years ago and plays an important role in global marine food webs and carbon cycling. more

Sea-ice ecosystem possibly triggered evolution of baleen whales and penguins
phys.org, April 18, 2013
The circum-Antarctic Southern Ocean is an important region for global marine food webs and carbon cycling because of sea-ice formation and its unique plankton ecosystem. The origin of its ecosystems can be traced back to the emergence of the Antarctic ice sheets approximately 33.6 million years ago. more

Teacher learning about Earth’s history at sea through ocean sediment cores
Troy Record, April 8, 2013
For the past week, a local high school earth science teacher has been on an international ocean drilling vessel learning about drilling ocean sediment cores off the coast of British Columbia. more

Understanding Pliocene and Our Future Climate
infoZine, April 4, 2013
Temperature patterns during Earth’s last prolonged global “hot spell”—the Pliocene, some 5.3 to 2.6 million years ago—differed dramatically from those of modern times, according to results reported in this week’s issue of the journal Nature. Cloud feedbacks, ocean mixing and other factors must have played a greater role in Pliocene warming than previously recognized, and these must be accounted for to make meaningful predictions of Earth’s future climate, the scientists said. more

Opportunity knocks: Doctoral student conducts research with international scientists
Indiana State University, March 21, 2013
For seven weeks, Ashley Burkett lived and worked on a floating laboratory far above where two tectonic plates collide under the Pacific Ocean. The research ship JOIDES (Joint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth Sampling) Resolution allowed Burkett and other scientists from around the globe to drill about 1,000 meters below the ocean’s floor and pull up samples to learn more about the area where one plate dives beneath another and creates earthquakes. more

First Evidence Of Life Deep Under Oceanic Crust Realized
redOrbit.com, March 15, 2013
Scientists writing in the journal Science say they have found the first direct evidence of life in the deeply buried oceanic crust. Researchers on board the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program’s (IODP) research vessel JOIDES Resolution drilled a water depth of 1.5 miles and hundreds of feet of sediment into the oceanic crust off the west coast of North America. After examining rock samples from this depth, they were able to uncover evidence of life, suggesting this ecosystem is largely supported by chemosynthesis, which is the biological conversion of molecules using oxidation or methane as a source of energy, rather than sunlight like in photosynthesis. more

Energy from Earth’s interior supports life in global ecosystem
phys.org, March 14, 2013
The Earth’s oceanic crust covers an enormous expanse, and is mostly buried beneath a thick layer of mud that cuts it off from the surface world. Scientists now document life deep within the oceanic crust that appears to be sustained by energy released from chemical reactions of rocks with water. more

Penicillin’s kin found in ocean “dead” spot
Futurity, January 24, 2013
Scientists have uncovered fungi that could be at least 100 million years old and say they are related to the species used to make penicillin. Discovering life at such incredible depths—more than 350 feet below the ocean floor and 12,000 feet under the water—could raise new questions about how life forms are able to exist in the most extreme environments. more

Scientific expedition studies geology of Costa Rican earthquake fault
Costa Rica Star, January 10, 2013
An international team of scientists has just returned from an ocean drilling expedition on board the JOIDES Resolution, near the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, designed to study the subduction zone where the Cocos tectonic plate dips beneath the Caribbean plate. This fault boundary was responsible for causing two earthquakes earlier this year, on September 5 and October 23. While the epicenter of those quakes was north of the study site, under the Nicoya Peninsula, the samples and data collected offshore will help scientists better understand how earthquakes happen—here in Costa Rica and elsewhere. more

2012

Scientists Drill Atlantic for Climate Change Clues
MarineLink.com, December 26, 2012
Researchers on board the scientific ocean drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution recently completed an expedition to the North Atlantic, near the coast of Newfoundland, Canada. Here, near the final resting place of the ill-fated RMS Titanic, large sediment drifts contain detailed records of the Paleogene – a span of about 40 million years when EarthÕs climate shifted from a sultry ÒhothouseÓ to a cooler climate, featuring the first polar ice sheets. more

When the ice melts, the Earth spews fire: Researchers discover a link between climate and volcanic eruptions
phys.org, December 19, 2012
It has long been known that volcanic activity can cause short-term variations in climate. Now, researchers at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (Germany), together with colleagues from Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA) have found evidence that the reverse process also occurs: Climate affects volcanic activity. Their study is now online in the international journal Geology. more

Does Melting Ice Cause Volcanic Eruptions?
redOrbit.com, December 19, 2012
Today, German researchers along with researchers from Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts have published a study detailing how global ice affects volcanoes. While it's long been understood a volcanic eruption can bring about a short period of cooler climates, this new study shows this cause-and-effect plays out on a much larger and longer stage. more

Ancient fungi found in deep-sea mud
Nature, December 11, 2012
Researchers have found evidence of fungi thriving far below the floor of the Pacific Ocean, in nutrient-starved sediments more than 100 million years old. The discovery has the potential to turn the brown muck of the sea floor into pure gold for biologists looking for alternative forms of life — and possibly for pharmaceutical companies seeking antibiotics to combat the growing problem of drug-resistant bacteria. more

Major Differences Found In Motions Of Volcanic "Hotspots"
Eurasia Review, November 27, 2012
But a new study that analyzes the Louisville hotspot in the southern Pacific Ocean found very little drift of its mantle plume, suggesting it is moving independently of its Hawaiian counterpart, and not as part of a large-scale mantle wind. more

Microfossils Reveal Secrets of Ancient Ocean Changes
Live Science, November 7, 2012
No matter how many times you've been in the ocean, you've probably never noticed foraminifera. But "forams," as scientists call these microscopic organisms for short, are everywhere — from the water surface to the seafloor, all around the world. They've been here since before the time of the dinosaurs, and now they're revealing vital information about the history of the world we live in. more

New Project Aims to Drill to the EarthÕs Mantle, 3.7 Miles Down
Smithsonian.com, October 4, 2012
One of the strangest facets of modern exploration is that we now have more experience with the surface of Mars than the layer of earth not too far beneath our feet. Nearly everything we know about the mantle—the 1,800-mile-thick semi-molten layer of the planet below the crust— comes indirectly: from computer simulations, mantle-derived rocks that made their way to the surface and observation of earthquake waves that move through the mantle. more

The $1 billion mission to reach the Earth's mantle
CNN, October 2, 2012
Humans have reached the moon and are planning to return samples from Mars, but when it comes to exploring the land deep beneath our feet, we have only scratched the surface of our planet. This may be about to change with a $1 billion mission to drill 6 km (3.7 miles) beneath the seafloor to reach the Earth's mantle -- a 3000 km-thick layer of slowly deforming rock between the crust and the core which makes up the majority of our planet -- and bring back the first ever fresh samples. more

Ocean science: Ancient burial at sea
Nature, August 30, 2012
A study reveals cyclic changes in the rate of burial of biogenic calcium carbonate at the Pacific ocean floor 43 million to 33 million years ago, as Earth exited a warm 'greenhouse' state to become an ice-capped planet. more

New Nature Study Illuminates 55 Million Years of the Carbon Cycle and Climate History
Nature, August 29, 2012
A study in the August 30 issue of Nature provides, in unprecedented detail, the history of a crucial indicator of the relationship between the carbon cycle and climate processes over the past 55 million years. more

Drilling for Clues to Ancient Climate
PBS Newshour, August 16, 2012
On the JOIDES Resolution research vessel, a team of scientists study the Earth's climate history by drilling deep into the ocean floor and analyzing the deep sea dirt. more

Scientists Use Ocean Drilling Data to Connect Seawater Chemistry with Climate Change and Evolution
July 23, 2012
Humans get much of the blame for modern climate change, with little attention paid to the contribution of other natural forces. But a new study in the July 20 issue of the journal Science sheds some light on one potential cause of the cooling trend of the past 45 million years. And it has everything to do with the chemistry of the worldÕs oceans. more

Drilling for dinosaur death: the JOIDES Resolution finds extinction in deep sea mud
Deep Sea News, July 10, 2012
There are scientists floating in the middle of the North Atlantic who are holding the dinosaur extinction in their hands. Really. Here it is: more

Quantum Correlations: Down There:
Life Under the Sediments Under the Sea

National Geographic News Watch, 23 April 2012
There’s buried treasure beneath the sea. James Cameron isn’t looking for it, it’s not the Heart of the Ocean, and it’s not near those fabulous deep sea vents we’ve come to adore. Rather, the prize of which I write is literally under the ocean – it’s the creatures that inhabit the sediment on the floor of the world and the basement rock below. more

Microbes may help unlock secrets of Earth's ocean
zeenews.com, 1 January 2012
Scientists are looking to microbes to discover the secrets of the igneous ocean crust, the ecosystem that still remains largely unexplored and unknown to science. ... Now, The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Mid-Atlantic Ridge Microbiology Expedition has set out to explore it. more

2011

Low CO2, global cooling linked
Yale Daily News, 7 December 2011
A new Yale study adds to the body of evidence that climate change is connected to carbon dioxide. Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels dropped shortly before ice formed in Antarctica 34 million years ago, according to a three-year study conducted by the Yale Department of Geology and Geophysics. more

Drop in carbon dioxide levels led to polar ice sheet, study finds
EurekAlert!, 1 December 2011
A drop in carbon dioxide appears to be the driving force that led to the Antarctic ice sheet's formation, according to a recent study led by scientists at Yale and Purdue universities of molecules from ancient algae found in deep-sea core samples. The key role of the greenhouse gas in one of the biggest climate events in Earth's history supports carbon dioxide's importance in past climate change and implicates it as a significant force in present and future climate. more

Observatory Safely Studies Deep-Sea Life
Wired, 29 November 2011
Miles below the ocean's surface lies one of the most inhospitable habitats on the planet. Deep inside subterranean cracks, where seawater seeps through the perpetually hot rock in Earth's crust, there's a surprisingly rich ecosystem of microorganisms. Scientists have long been eager to study these creatures—along with the larger geological setting—but drilling holes in the seafloor large enough to drop instruments down floods the habitat with cold water and kills off the fauna. more

Austria to take part in "breakthrough" deep sea expedition
Austrian Independent, 16 November 2011
An Austrian scientist will be actively involved, for the first time, in a breakthrough expedition with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) into the depths of the oceanic crust. more

International Ocean Drilling to Follow Simpler Structure
Science Insider, 15 November 2011
A decision by the United States to leave an international consortium for ocean drilling doesn't mean that every country must now fend for itself. That's the message from a meeting last week in Granada, Spain, at which the participants drew up a new framework for the operation of ocean drilling platforms. more

Scientists to review seabed data
The Timaru Herald, 15 November 2011
High-profile scientists from around the world are meeting in Oamaru to review results from ocean drilling off the coast of South Canterbury last year. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program scientists drilled four sites on the continental shelf off Canterbury, using the seafloor drilling ship, JOIDES Resolution, and recovered sediment cores going back as far as 35 million years. The cores were analysed over 22 months and scientists involved will discuss their findings at the conference this week. more

International Ocean Drilling Pointing the Way on Climate Change
Xinhua News Agency, 15 November 2011
The earth's oceans are rising as a result of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but how fast and how high could they go? Those questions will be discussed by about 40 scientists from around the world, who will gather in New Zealand this week to discuss the results of a global seabed drilling project that could help anticipate the effects of climate change on the oceans. more

Siem Offshore Acquires 50% Interest In Overseas Drilling Ltd.
Hart Energy E&P, 5 August 2011
Siem Offshore Inc. has acquired the remaining 50% ownership interest in the shares of Overseas Drilling Ltd. (ODL) from a subsidiary of Transocean Ltd. for USD$22.5 million. ... Siem Offshore has taken over full management of the vessel "Joides Resolution" from 1st of August 2011. more

"We'll take all of it" - Siem Offshore grabs full ownership of drillship from Transocean
gCaptain, 3 August 2011
Siem Offshore has taken over the remaining 50% ownership interest in Overseas Drilling Ltd (ODL) from a subsidiary of Transocean, including full management of the scientific ocean drilling ship Joides Resolution as of August 1. more

Pacific-based earthquake triggers in the spotlight
CORDIS News, 18 July 2011
An international team of researchers is unearthing the triggering mechanisms behind large, destructive earthquakes like the Tohoku earthquake that hit Japan last March. ... Supported by the scientific drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution during the latest Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP) Expedition, the samples provide key information in relation to 2 million years of tectonic activity along a seismic plate boundary. more

Researchers shed light on magma-seawater boundary
CORDIS News, 4 July 2011
Scientists on the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 335 Superfast Spreading Rate Crust 4 have succeeded in recovering a set of heat-tempered basalts: these offer a comprehensive picture of the boundary between magma and seawater, something that has not been easy to get. Completing operations in Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1256D, a deep scientific borehole over 1,500 metres below the seabed into the igneous crust of the Pacific Ocean, the research team sampled a full section of the intact oceanic crust down into gabbros in one of the planet's deepest 'hard rock' penetration sites of scientific ocean drilling, said the IODP in a statement. more

Heavy Metal Meets Hard Rock: Battling Through the Ocean Crust's Hardest Rocks
Science Daily, 30 June 2011
Scientists and drillers recovered a remarkable suite of heat-tempered basalts that provide a detailed picture of the rarely seen boundary between magma and seawater. These samples were collected during a return to ODP Hole 1256D, one of the deepest "hard rock" penetration sites of scientific ocean drilling. ODP Hole 1256D has been stabilized, cleared to its full depth, and primed for further deepening. more

Scientists study earthquake triggers in Pacific Ocean
Eureka! Science News, 30 June 2011
New samples of rock and sediment from the depths of the eastern Pacific Ocean may help explain the cause of large, destructive earthquakes similar to the Tohoku Earthquake that struck Japan in mid-March. Nearly 1500 meters (almost one mile) of core collected from the ocean floor near the coast of Costa Rica reveal detailed records of approximately 2 million years of tectonic activity along a seismic plate boundary. more

Geosciences Launches GeoX for High School Students
TAMU News, 5 June 2011
Twenty high school students are scheduled to arrive on campus Friday (June 3) to explore geosciences, learn about Texas A&M and possibly begin their paths to a lifelong career. It will be a week of firsts for the Texas high school students, who make up the inaugural GeoX class of 2011, sponsored by the College of Geosciences. more

Ocean Current Changes Led To Dramatic Global Cooling
Irish Weather Online, 28 May 2011
Thirty-eight million years ago, tropical jungles thrived in what are now the cornfields of the American Midwest and furry marsupials wandered temperate forests in what is now the frozen Antarctic. The temperature differences of that era, known as the late Eocene, between the equator and Antarctica were half what they are today. A debate has been ongoing in the scientific community about what changes in our global climate system led to such a major shift from the more tropical, greenhouse climate of the Eocene to modern and much cooler climates. more

Down to the Core: Craig Fulthorpe Co-Leads Expedition to Canterbury Basin
Jackson School of Geoscience, University of Texas, 27 May 2011
Craig Fulthorpe was a grad student when his advisor walked into his office and asked if he would like to be part of the first scientific expedition organized by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). ... "Going on ODP Leg 101 introduced me to this whole community in a way that might not have happened otherwise," he says. more

Climate shift: Currents play vital role
Global Adventures, 27 May 2011
Antarctica (global-adventures.us): Thirty-eight million years ago, tropical jungles thrived in what are now the cornfields of the American Midwest and furry marsupials wandered temperate forests in what is now the frozen Antarctic. The temperature differences of that era, known as the late Eocene, between the equator and Antarctica were half what they are today. more

What lies beneath the seafloor? Paper provides results from first microbial subsurface observatory experiment
EurekAlert!, 3 May 2011
An international team of scientists report on the first observatory experiment to study the dynamic microbial life of an ever-changing environment inside Earth's crust. University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science professor Keir Becker contributed the deep-sea technology required to make long-term scientific observations of life beneath the seafloor. more

Royal wedding: Your party pictures
BBC News, 30 April 2011
An international team of scientists report on the first observatory experiment to study the dynamic microbial life of an ever-changing environment inside Earth's crust. University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science professor Keir Becker contributed the deep-sea technology required to make long-term scientific observations of life beneath the seafloor. more

Science: Journey to the center of the earth
Global Post, 21 April 2011
It's a big step on scientists' dream journey to the center of the earth. A team of 30 researchers is on an expedition to extract rocks from the deepest point ever reached beneath the ocean floor. The team hopes to drill over 6,200 feet (1.2 miles) down a hole some 560 miles off the Pacific coast of this Central American country. more

Drilling into the planet: Why we want to sample the mantle (and why we already have)
Big Think, 28 March 2011
I've had multiple discussions with colleagues of mine in the geosciences on why we can't seem to capture the public's attention/fascination like our neighbors in the sciences - physics and astronomy (and for me, literal neighbors in the same building). ... One idea is to do to the Earth was Apollo did to the Moon - that is, to go boldly* where no man (or drillbit) has gone before: the mantle. more

Journey to the mantle of the Earth
Nature, 23 March 2011
Retrieving a sample of Earth's mantle has been an overarching ambition of the geoscience community for more than a century. ... A new Mohole campaign is now under way, thanks to improved technology, a better understanding of the rocks far below our feet and a deeper appreciation of the challenges of drilling through them. more

Probing the Moho Boundary - Earth's Own Unexplored Frontier
Universe Today, 23 March 2011
The boundary where Earth's crust gives way to the unexplored mantle was first detected in 1909, because of a change in the travel of seismic waves. Named the Moho boundary for Andrija Mohorovicic, who listened to those seismic waves, the crust-mantle boundary is a frontier that remains elusive and compelling ... Damon Teagle and Benoit Ildefonse have written about the ongoing efforts for an article in the journal Nature, released today. more

Natural global warming period illuminated by new data
Examiner.com, 28 February 2011
Documentable knowledge of the effects of the PaleoceneÐEocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) on plant and ocean life has been reported from a new Arctic drill site on Spitsbergen was reported by scientists on February 25, 2011, at the EurekaAlert site. The PaleoceneÐEocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) occurred about 56 million years ago. The global sea surface temperature rose about 5 degrees Celsius during that time. more

Volcano voyage seeks truth about hotspots
Australian Geographic, 21 February 2011
Deep-sea volcanoes created by hotspots are helping scientists understand the movement of Earth's continents through history. A RECENT EXPEDITION TO a great chain of underwater volcanoes 1500 km north-east of New Zealand may provide new insight into the geography of the Earth millions of years ago. more

Shaded reefs record sea level
Science Alert, 21 February 2011
Limestone terraces - the relics of the Great Barrier Reef of the past - could give hints on a "tipping point" that could trigger catastrophic climate change in the greenhouse in future, according to new research from the University of Sydney. more

Submarine Volcanoes Hint at Earth's Formation
Cosmos, 16 February 2011
The Louisville Seamount Trail of volcanoes are thought to have been created up to 85 million years ago, as the Pacific oceanic plate passed over a Ôhotspot' - a plume of material originating from a region deep within the mantle - according to David Buchs from The Australian National University in Canberra, who took part in the study. more

Underwater Volcanoes a Hotbed of Clues to Earth's Movements
Our Amazing Planet, 16 February 2011
Nearly half a mile of rock retrieved from beneath the seafloor is yielding new clues about how underwater volcanoes are created and whether the underlying hot spots of molten rock that lead to their formation have moved over time. Geoscientists have just completed an expedition, part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), to a string of underwater volcanoes , or seamounts, in the Pacific Ocean known as the Louisville Seamount Trail. more

Volcano study lays foundations for ancient maps
University of Queensland News, 14 February 2011
Research into submarine volcanoes in the Pacific Ocean will lay the groundwork for scientists to map the Earth as it was millions of years ago. An international team of scientists has just returned from a two-month expedition to the Louisville Seamount Trail, a 4300km-long chain of extinct, underwater volcanoes 1500km northeast of New Zealand. more

Kids delve into the deep
The Aucklander, 2 February 2011
Silence envelops the Oceans Gallery in Auckland's War Memorial Museum. ... This is a typical scene at the Ship to Shore talks, one of five Monday sessions during which scientists, on a two-month expedition to study deep Earth, use Skype to discuss their findings and experiences with the public. ... Speaking from mid-ocean aboard the cutting-edge research vessel Joides Resolution, the scientists have everyone's attention. more

2010

Ocean may contain nuclear powered microbes
ABC Science, 14 December 2010
New ocean sediment cores are expected to contain ultra tough microbes that can survive without organic matter or sunlight, researchers say. The US research vessel JOIDES Resolution as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program docked in Auckland on Monday, carrying a payload of sediment cores containing microbes which are expected to shed light on how life might exist on Mars, or Jupiter's moon Europa and other planets. more

Half of life could be hidden undersea
stuff.co.nz, 13 December 2010
Half of the Earth's living matter could be locked two to three kilometres below the ocean floor. New Zealand co-ordinator for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, Guiseppe Cortese says the findings are thanks to IODP geosciences research programme. For two months a crew of international scientists onboard the IODP's research vessel the JOIDES Resolution have studied the subsurface life in a largely unexplored region of the ocean between South America and Australia called the South Pacific Gyre. more

Pliocene Warm Period Takes Us Back To The Future
science 2.0, 13 December 2010
The Bering Sea, northward extension of the Pacific Ocean between Siberia and Alaska, was ice-free and full of life during the last major warm period, a new study has shown. Deep sediment cores retrieved from the Bering Sea floor indicate that the region was ice-free all year and biological productivity was high during the last major warm period in Earth's climate history. more

Bering Sea was ice-free and full of life during last warm period, study finds
EurekAlert!, 13 December 2010
Deep sediment cores retrieved from the Bering Sea floor indicate that the region was ice-free all year and biological productivity was high during the last major warm period in Earth's climate history. ... Ravelo and co-chief scientist Kozo Takahashi of Kyushu University, Japan, led a nine-week expedition of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) to the Bering Sea last summer aboard the research vessel JOIDES Resolution. The researchers drilled down 700 meters through rock and sludge to retrieve sediments deposited during the Pliocene Warm Period, 3.5 to 4.5 million years ago. more

URI oceanographers on ship in South Pacific to host videoconference with students at Jamestown school
Media-Newswire.com, 7 December 2010
Three oceanography professors at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography, who are now aboard a research ship in the South Pacific, will use videoconferencing technology to talk about their research with students at Lawn Avenue School and Melrose School in Jamestown on Dec. 9 at 10:15 a.m. ... Professors Steven D'Hondt, David Smith and Art Spivack, will join the school's sixth grade students on a virtual tour of the ship and participate in a question and answer session about the expedition. more

Life Found Deep Underground
Earthweek, 26 November 2010
A U.S. drilling project attempting to reach the level just above Earth's mantle has found evidence of life 4,500 feet beneath the surface, where temperatures are higher than the boiling point of water. ... A team from Oregon State University found unique types of bacteria there, which feed off hydrocarbons like methane and benzene, similar to microorganisms present in underground oil deposits. more

South Rowan students tour marine research vessel via Skype
Salisbury Post, NC, 25 November 2010
Karen Miller's South Rowan High School marine biology students had a special tour recently of a marine research vessel out in the middle of the Pacific. The students came to South Rowan Regional Library to participate in a Skype videoconferencing session where they were able to ask questions of "Teacher at Sea" Joe Monaco, who gave students a live video tour of the research vessel JOIDES Resolution and its scientific operations, including drilling through the sea floor and core sample research. more

Carbon-eating Microbes Discovered Deep in Oceanic Crust
Environment News Services, 22 November 2010
Deep in the Earth's oceanic crust, scientists have found bacteria that can eat hydrocarbons and natural gas, and have the genetic potential to store carbon. ... Now, the findings by researchers from Oregon State University reveal a possible role for the deep ocean crust in carbon dioxide storage and fixation by pumping carbon dioxide into deep subsea layers where it might be sequestered permanently. more

Life found in deep layer of Earth's crust
United Press International (UPI.com), 18 November 2010
A U.S. expedition drilling into the deepest layer of the Earth's oceanic crust, just above the mantle, has found evidence of life there, researchers say. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program sank its drill into the Atlantis Massif in the central Atlantic Ocean where seismic forces have pushed the deep layer, known as the gabbroic layer, to within 230 feet of the ocean floor making it easier to reach, NewScientist.com reported. more

Seafloor Drilling Expedition Finds Deepest Life Yet Discovered
Popular Science, 11 November 2010
The "life is persistent" argument is often used to bolster the idea that life exists elsewhere in the universe. While that remains to be seen, the notion certainly keeps proving true here on the home planet. Scientists have found life thriving in near superheated ocean vents, in inhospitable parts of Antarctica, and in the depths of subterranean oil reservoirs. Now, a drilling expedition to the deepest layer of the Earth's crust has found life there as well, and the evidence suggests there could be more life even deeper. more

Probing the depths of the biosphere
We, beasties, 10 November 2010
Rarely do I read papers whose title really sums up exactly what is so cool about the study in a succinct way, free of jargon. I think that "First Investigation of the Microbiology of the Deepest Layer of Ocean Crust" does just that. It isn't trying to be sexy... it just is! Examining the microbial communities in the so-called "deep subsurface biosphere" is a relatively new field. Until recently people didn't think there was much, or really any, life deep in Earth's crust. As with many scientific assumptions made before scientists had the opportunity to actually study a new environment... these were clearly wrong! more

Hydrocarbon consuming microbes found independent of BP
Birmingham Examiner.com, 8 November 2010
A team of scientists has reported the discovery of a variety of hydrocarbon consuming microbes that exist in the deep sea areas around deep sea oil drilling operations. The research was published at the Public Library of Science on November 5, 2010. more

Cross-country connection
auburnpub.com, 25 October 2010
A local educator created a cross-country connection last month when she went on a 10-day ocean science research expedition and allowed students here the opportunity to participate in a video conference with scientists aboard a research vessel. Amy Work, geospatial information systems (GIS) analyst and education coordinator, can usually be found in the Institute for the Application of Geospatial Technology at Cayuga Community College. more

Smoky Hill teacher: Adventure has a place in learning
Aurora Sentinel, 14 October 2010
Ken Hamner wanted to have an adventure. For most of the school year, the Smoky Hill High School teacher is satisfied teaching students about osmosis and cell division. But when Hamner learned about an opportunity to participate in the "School of Rock" program, an annual excursion led by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, he didn't hesitate to apply. more

NSF Celebrates 50 Years of U.S.-Japan Collaborations
ScienceInsider, 7 October 2010
"Science diplomacy is a hot topic, but no one knows exactly what it means," Norman Neureiter, a chemist with a distinguished career both in the U.S. Government and at Texas Instruments, said at a symposium in Tokyo on 6 October. more

URI oceanographer to lead return visit to least inhabited place on Earth
EurekAlert!, 30 September 2010
Four University of Rhode Island oceanographers depart next week for an international research expedition to the middle of the South Pacific Gyre - an area that is as far from any continent as is possible to go on Earth's surface - to look for evidence of life far beneath the seafloor. ... This year's nine-week expedition seeks to look for evidence of life in the older, deeper sediment and "the basaltic basement." more

Observatory Network Installed Under Ocean Floor
Softpedia, 8 September 2010
Scientists with the IODP initiative this year conducted a new expedition off the coasts of Canada, in a bid to install a sensor network deep under the ocean floor. The array will be used for running innovative, cutting-edge marine experiments. The team spent about two months aboard the scientific research vessel JOIDES Resolution, in waters off British Columbia. During this time, marine geologists drilled deep holes into the ocean floors, and installed advanced scientific equipment within. more

Adapting to a changing climate
Planet Earth, 3 September 2010
The British Geological Survey's climate change programme is just two years old, but is already tackling some of the toughest questions to emerge from climate science. Mike Ellis explains how. more

Great Barrier Reef's great-grandmother is unearthed
NewScientist, 19 August 2010
Just 600 metres away from the Great Barrier Reef, the jewel in Australia's crown, a less spectacular but more ancient reef has been discovered. ... Confirmation arrived in February this year, when an international team extracted 34 sediment cores from three sites on the seabed, revealing a fossilised coral reef that reaches 110 metres into the sea floor. Preliminary dating of the core indicates that the coral is up to 169,000 years old. more

Coral cores show sea history
ScienceAlert, 3 August 2010
A team of international scientists, including Dr Jody Webster from the University of Sydney, have taken part in a groundbreaking voyage to the Great Barrier Reef between February to April this year to acquire fossil coral reef cores from the edge of the continental shelf. more

Challenges Await Ocean Drilling Projects
Texas A&M University, 27 July 2010
Scientific ocean drilling has a bright future, but a number of challenges loom on the horizon, attendees said Monday at the conclusion of their workshop organized by the National Research Council's Committee on Scientific Ocean Drilling. more

Ocean Drilling Projects Have Changed Scientific Thinking, Experts Say
Texas A&M University, 26 July 2010
Scientific ocean drilling projects have broadened mankind's knowledge of Earth, opened doors to new fields and raised key questions for future groundbreaking endeavors, said speakers attending the National Research Council's Committee on Scientific Ocean Drilling. more

Cool Jobs: Scientist drills deep into ocean's crust
Federal News Radio (1500 AM), 14 July 2010
Jamie Allan's job is to drill deep holes into the ocean's crust. Really deep. As program officer for the National Science Foundation's Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, Allan drills some of the deepest holes ever dug into the floor of the ocean. But IODP is not just a group of kids in a sandbox. Allan says his team is working on multiple important scientific projects. more

China outlines deep-sea ambitions
Nature, 6 July 2010
China is setting its sights on exploring and exploiting the deep sea. Until recently, the country's ocean research focused largely on coastal and offshore waters. But with its breakneck economic development demanding ever more resources, and a growing desire to have more influence in territory disputes and international waters, China is investing heavily in its deep-sea research and exploration programme, experts revealed at a meeting in Shanghai last week. more

Polar extremes affect tropics
European Commission CORDIS, 21 June 2010
A Spanish-led team of scientists has proven that there is a link between ocean temperatures at Earth's polar extremes and the climate at the equator, thousands of miles away. The finding serves as further evidence that oceanic behaviour does indeed influence global climate. Results from the study are published in the journal Science. more

CO2 is The Missing Link To Past Global Climate Changes
redOrbit, 18 June 2010
CO2 levels explain why temperatures in tropical and arctic waters have risen and fallen together for the past 2.7 million years... Now, a research team led by Brown University has established that the climate in the tropics over at least the last 2.7 million years changed in lockstep with the cyclical spread and retreat of ice sheets thousands of miles away in the Northern Hemisphere. more

The key role of the oceans' subpolar regions in the climate control of the tropics is confirmed
e! Science News, 18 June 2010
An international team of researchers, led by the members of the Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA) at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), has published the first registers of the evolution of Northern Pacific and Southern Atlantic sea-surface temperatures, dating from the Pliocene Era -some 3.65 million years ago- to the present. more

Antarctica's Past Revealing Earth's Future
Planetsave, 3 May 2010
New sediment cores taken from the seabed in Antarctica may give us clues as to our planet's future climate. Scientists participating in the Wilkes Land Glacial History expedition of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program have recently returned home with 2,000 metres of sediment cores from Wilkes Land, directly south of Australia, in an effort to add more data to global climate models. more

Ocean Drilling Expedition off Antarctica May Predict Ice Sheet's Response to Warmer Global Temperatures
PhysOrg.com, 4 May 2010
New results from a drilling expedition off Antarctica may help scientists learn more about a dramatic turn in climate 34 million years ago, when the planet cooled from a "greenhouse" to an "icehouse" state. In just 400,000 years - a blink of an eye in geologic time - carbon dioxide levels dropped, temperatures plunged and ice sheets formed over what was then the lush continent of Antarctica. more

Antarctic Ice Cores Hold Clues of Future Climate
Softpedia, 30 April 2010
Between January 4 and March 8 this year, an international team of experts conducted the Wilkes Land Glacial History Expedition in Antarctica, as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). During the study, the scientists collected ice core samples from the location, which they then transported back to the lab for analysis. Now, the data they obtained is being used to inform a new generation of computer models aimed at simulating future climate events based on our planet's past evolution. more

Data could help unlock mystery of undersea supervolcanoes
Thaindian News, 12 April 2010
cientists drilling into a large volcanic mountain chain lying underwater off the coast of Japan have collected new data that may provide clues to unlocking the mystery of undersea supervolcanoes. In 2009, they undertook the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 324, drilling five sites on the Pacific Ocean floor to study the origin of the 145 million-year-old Shatsky Rise volcanic mountain chain. more

New Research into How Supervolcanoes Erupt
Softpedia, 10 April 2010
For many years, researchers have been proposing that one of the primary reasons for some of the world's most devastating extinction events was the explosion of supervolcanoes. These are massive relatives of their smaller counterparts, and have the ability to release vast amounts of lava, gas and ash around them. One example is the Yellowstone Caldera, which, if it were to blow up, would cover the entire United States in a thick layer of ash, and would cloud the skies for decades. more

Deciphering the Mysteries of an Ancient Seafloor Goliath
Texas A&M University, 9 April 2010
The eruptions of "supervolcanoes" on Earth's surface have been blamed for causing mass extinctions, belching large amounts of gases and particles into the atmosphere, and re-paving the ocean floor. The result? Loss of species, increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and changes in ocean circulation. Despite their global impact, the origin and triggering mechanism of these eruptions remain poorly understood. New data collected during a recent Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) scientific research expedition in the Pacific Ocean may provide clues to unlocking this unsolved mystery in Earth's geologic record. more

Antarctica once had tropical climate, scientists say
APC News (Australia), 12 March 2010
An international team of scientists who have arrived back in Hobart from Antarctica say they have evidence the icy continent once had a tropical climate. The team studied ice and mud cores from the Antarctic sea floor. more

Antarctica once had tropical climate, scientists say
Australia's ABC News, 12 March 2010
Scientists on United States-based research drillship, the Joides Resolution, have docked in Wellington to offload kilometres of core samples from sediments in the Canterbury Basin. The scientists drilled four holes on the continental shelf and slope off south Canterbury over the past month. more

Buried Alive: Half of Earth's Life May Lie Below Land, Sea
McClatchy Newspapers, 9 March 2010
While astronomers scour the skies for signs of life in outer space, biologists are exploring an enormous living world buried below the surface of the Earth. Scientists estimate that nearly half the living material on our planet is hidden in or beneath the ocean or in rocks, soil, tree roots, mines, oil wells, lakes and aquifers on the continents. more

Studying Life in Earth's 'Basement'
KidGlue, 9 March 2010
Nearly half of the living material on our planet is hidden deep under ground or under water. Science calls this world of deep dwelling life the "subsurface biosphere" a dark place where light from the sun and stars has never fallen. Or, for those who want to be less technical about it, "Earth's basement." more

The Undersea Hunt for Intraterrestrial Life
Popular Science, 9 March 2010
Despite the impact of mankind, the size of trees, and the sheer numbers of bugs, multicellular terrestrial life only makes up a small portion of the planet's biomass. The majority of life on Earth lives at the bottom of the ocean, much of it beneath the ocean floor. Thanks to those extreme depths, science knows virtually nothing about the majority of the planet's lifeforms. But a series of deep sea drilling expeditions over the course of the next year looks to finally shine a light on our planet's richest, and most mysterious, habitats. more

Tiny shelled creatures shed light on extinction and recovery 65 million years ago
EurekAlert!, 1 March 2010
An asteroid strike may not only account for the demise of ocean and land life 65 million years ago, but the fireball's path and the resulting dust, darkness and toxic metal contamination may explain the geographic unevenness of extinctions and recovery, according to Penn State geoscientists. more

Hamilton students to participate in live broadcast with scientists in Antarctica
The Westside Story (CY-FAIR ISD), 24 February 2010
Third-grade students at Hamilton Elementary School will have the unique opportunity to serve as an "interactive school" on Wednesday, Feb. 24. Using satellite communications technology provided by IOCOM, the students will participate in a live video conference with scientists, technicians and crew on board the scientific ocean drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution on its way to Antarctica. more

On Thick Ice: Live From An Antarctic Drilling Trip
Popular Mechanics, 18 February 2010
About 140 miles from the Antarctic coast, the scientific research ship JOIDES Resolution is drilling deep into the ocean floor. The objective: To find out how Antarctica changed from a warm and vegetated continent, as it was 50 million years ago, to the frozen, ice-covered continent we see today. more

Fossils 'record past sea changes'
BBC News, 15 February 2010
Fossilised coral reefs in the Great Barrier Reef could help scientists understand how sea levels have changed over the past 20,000 years. An international team of researchers will spend 45 days at sea, gathering core samples from about 40 sites. more

Mineral veins hold clues to ancient seawater
PlanetEarth, 16 February 2010
Seawater has changed over time. Now scientists have found a new way to determine how, by looking at the chemical composition of carbonate veins found in the ocean crust. 'The chemistry of seawater is controlled by what has been added to or taken out of the ocean,' explains Dr Rosalind Coggon, a geochemist working at Imperial College, London. more

Queens College geologist journeys to Antarctica to study global warming
NY Daily News, 9 February 2010
Studying global warming in the coldest place on Earth may sound like an oxymoron. But Queens College geologist Stephen Pekar is on a ship off the coast of Antarctica, doing just that. more

Carbonate Veins Reveal Chemistry of Ancient Seawater
ScienceDaily, 8 February 2010
The chemical composition of our oceans is not constant but has varied significantly over geological time. In a study published in Science, researchers describe a novel method for reconstructing past ocean chemistry using calcium carbonate veins that precipitate from seawater-derived fluids in rocks beneath the seafloor. more

Scientists Drill Deepest Hole off New Zealand
PhysOrg.com, 4 February 2010
Scientists aboard the research ship the JOIDES Resolution recently drilled two kilometers into Earth's crust, setting a new record for the deepest hole drilled through the seafloor on a single expedition. more

Drilling project to reveal climate change in Antarctic
The Hindu, 29 January 2010
The world's largest marine geoscience project is underway to drill deep beneath the Antarctic to discover clues to climate change. That would involve boring through two km of rock in the sea bed, seven km deep in the ocean. Rob McKay, post-doctoral fellow at Victoria University's Antarctic Research Centre, is aboard the Joides Resolution research ship bound for Wilkes Land, Antarctica. more

Climate Research Group Drills Deepest Hole in the Ocean
Softpedia, 26 January 2010
At this point in time, the effects of global warming and climate change are becoming increasingly obvious, and researchers need to work together with authorities to produce valid science and policies, aimed at preventing devastating effects. But in order to do that, policymakers need to base their decisions on accurate model. For that to happen, scientists have to make the models, based on data collected from expeditions to some of the harshest places on the planet. more

Canterbury Basin drilled for climate clues
NZPA, 5 January 2010
Scientists on United States-based research drillship, the Joides Resolution, have docked in Wellington to offload kilometres of core samples from sediments in the Canterbury Basin. The scientists drilled four holes on the continental shelf and slope off south Canterbury over the past month. more

2009

Montclair University professors heading up Antarctica trips to study global warming effects
New Jersey News, 25 December 2009
Two Montclair State University professors are heading to Antarctica on separate expeditions to collect sediment samples scientists can use to study the effects of global warming. A rise in sea level of just a few meters from melting ice caps could put coastal areas like Atlantic City in jeopardy, said Sandra Passchier, an assistant professor of earth and environmental studies. more

Global warming likely to be amplified by slow changes to Earth systems
EurekAlert, 20 December 2009
Researchers studying a period of high carbon dioxide levels and warm climate several million years ago have concluded that slow changes such as melting ice sheets amplified the initial warming caused by greenhouse gases. more

Global temperatures could rise more than expected, new study shows
EurekAlert, 20 December 2009
The kinds of increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide taking place today could have a significantly larger effect on global temperatures than previously thought, according to a new study led by Yale University geologists. Their findings appear December 20 in the advanced online edition of Nature Geoscience. more

Meteor hit unlikely cause for climate change, study finds
Star Bulletin, 13 December 2009
It's "very unlikely" that a meteor or asteroid colliding with the Earth caused an abrupt climate change leading to the extinction of the woolly mammoth and other large mammals 13,000 years ago, says the University of Hawaii at Manoa leader of a team that investigated the theory. more

Research project worth saving
Japan Times, 10 December 2009
Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama will support science, but wasteful construction projects under review by the Government Revitalization Unit (GRU) include large, complex scientific research projects. more

Core data on climate
ScienceWise, 27 November 2009
Australia and New Zealand have recently signed up to the world's largest ocean research program - The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). IODP is a multi-national scientific collaboration aimed at extracting data from core samples taken at numerous points throughout the worldÕs oceans. more

Sifting the past for clues to present
timesunion.com, 26 November 2009
Miriam Katz sees the world in a grain of sand. The fossils she plucks from the deep sea floor are tiny, but can reveal much about sea level, temperature, and ocean conditions on Earth millions of years ago. The assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has spent two decades collecting the complex little shells of calcium carbonate, known as foraminifera. more

Seabed drilling probes sea level change
GNS Science, 16 November 2009
An international team of 33 scientists will spend the next two months drilling beneath the seabed off the Canterbury coast in a bid to pin down the link between climate and sea level changes over the last 35 million years. more

Seafloor fossils to reconstruct EarthÕs climates up to 250 million years ago
Thaindian News, 8 November 2009
In a research lasting two decades, a scientist has studied ancient, deep-sea fossils to reconstruct the climates of Earth up to 250 million years ago. more

Drilling expedition to find cause of changing sea levels
Drilling Exploration, 6 November 2009
The research drilling ship JOIDES resolution has welcomed two Australian scientists on a voyage to investigate changing sea levels. James Cook University's Professor Bob Carter and Associate Professor Simon George from Macquarie University will be joining the ship. more

Drill team probes sea changes
James Cook University, 6 November 2009
Two Australian scientists will join an international group of researchers on a voyage to investigate changing sea levels. They will be part of the research drilling ship JOIDES Resolution expedition to the Canterbury Basin off New Zealand. more

Seafloor Fossils Provide Clues on Climate Change
insciences.org, 22 October 2009
Deep under the sea, a fossil the size of a sand grain is nestled among a billion of its closest dead relatives. Known as foraminifera, these complex little shells of calcium carbonate can tell you the sea level, temperature, and ocean conditions of Earth millions of years ago. That is, if you know what to look for. more

Bering Sea: coming back to reality
ETH Life, 13 October 2009
ETH researcher Gretta Bartoli spent two months working on board the research ship in the northern Pacific. Now back in Zurich, she takes a look back at an eventful period far removed from her daily routine. more

'Scary' Climate Message from Past
BBC News, 12 October 2009
A new historical record of carbon dioxide levels suggests current political targets on climate may be "playing with fire", scientists say. Researchers used ocean sediments to plot CO2 levels back 20 million years. Levels similar to those now commonly regarded as adequate to tackle climate change were associated with sea levels 25-40 m (80-130 ft) higher than today. more

Just How Sensitive Is Earth's Climate to Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide?
Scientific American, 8 October 2009
Carbon dioxide levels climbing toward a doubling of the 280 parts per million (ppm) concentration found in the preindustrial atmosphere pose the question: What impact will this increased greenhouse gas load have on the climate? more

Stuck in the mud
Planet Earth, 5 October 2009
How can microscopic bullet splatter on the clothing of murder victims help climate scientists? Guy Rothwell describes some of the remarkable techniques sedimentary core specialists are using to piece together past climates. more

Experts Draw Up Ocean-Drilling Wish List
Nature, 1 October 2009
Earth scientists have laid the groundwork for the future of ocean drilling. More than 500 scientists — almost twice as many as organizers had initially expected — gathered last week in Bremen, Germany, to discuss priorities and research goals for the second phase of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), which is expected to begin in late 2013. more

IOCOM and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Partner for Educational Video Conferencing Tutorials
IOCOM, 28 September 2009
IOCOM, a leading software provider for enterprise-class video conferencing and collaboration capabilities, today announced its ongoing partnership with the Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramÕs (IODP) Deep Earth Academy to offer educational video conferencing for students to witness live, deep-sea voyages. more

International Conference To Plan Future Of Ocean Drilling
kbtx.com, 10 September 2009
The future of scientific ocean drilling will be planned Sept. 23-25 in Bremen, Germany, when 11 faculty and scientists and four graduate students from Texas A&M University join an international assemblage of nearly 500 scientists at the INVEST conference Ð IODP New Ventures in Exploring Scientific Targets. more

Researchers report successful riser-drilling operations in seismogenic zone
EurekAlert, 30 July 2009
Kumano Basin off Kii Peninsula, approximately 58 km southeast of Japan — Despite harsh atmospheric and ocean conditions, and complex geological characteristics of its drill site, the deep-sea drilling vessel CHIKYU, for the first time in the history of scientific ocean drilling, conducted riser-drilling operations to successfully drill down to a depth of 1,603.7 meters beneath the sea floor (at water depth of 2,054 meters). more

Scientists Drill a Mile Into Active Deep Sea Fault Zone
Wired Science, 30 July 2009
In the first deep sea drilling expedition designed to gather seismic data, scientists have successfully drilled nearly a mile beneath the ocean floor into one of the world's most active earthquake zones. more

Major Arctic Sea-ice Formed Earlier Than Thought
Science Daily, 28 July 2009
Significant sea ice formation occurred in the Arctic earlier than previously thought is the conclusion of a study published this week in Nature. "The results are also especially exciting because they suggest that sea ice formed in the Arctic before it did in Antarctica..." more

Drilling ship to probe sea floor: Resolution sets off from Ogden Point today for the Bering Sea
Times Colonist, 10 July 2009
The scientific drilling ship JOIDES Resolution isn't much to look at, with its jutting cranes and derrick -- a contrast to the smooth lines of cruise ships at Ogden Point's other pier. But what the 144-metre-long vessel lacks in grace it makes up for in scientific gusto. The Resolution is the only American ship dedicated to drilling the sea floor for scientific purposes. more

UCSC Professor Seeks Climate Answers in the Bering Sea
Santa Cruz Sentinel, 8 July 2009
Instead of taking the summer off this year, UC Santa Cruz ocean studies professor Christina Ravelo will sail into the Bering Sea with hopes of peeking back into 5 million years worth of geological history — and bringing scientists closer to understanding global climate change. more

Sediment Yields Climate Record For Past Half-million Years
Science Daily, 16 June 2009
Researchers here have used sediment from the deep ocean bottom to reconstruct a record of ancient climate that dates back more than the last half-million years. The record, trapped within the top 20 meters (65.6 feet) of a 400-meter (1,312-foot) sediment core drilled in 2005 in the North Atlantic Ocean by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, gives new information about the four glacial cycles that occurred during that period. more

Earth's Climate and Ocean Acidification History
ScienceDaily, 22 May 2009
A scientific research cruise following the palaeo-equator has uncovered nearly 53 million years of climate and ocean acidification history. Three scientists from the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton were onboard. more

Quibbletown Science Teacher to Join School of Rock Science Expedition
mycentraljersey.com, 20 May 2009
Quibbletown Science Teacher Ed Cohen was chosen to participate in the School of Rock 2009 workshop on board the ship, the JOIDES Resolution from June 23 to July 5. There, alongside scientists and technicians, educators will study a very active tectonic plate in the Pacific Ocean known as the Juan de Fuca plate, examining core samples of the Earth. more

Drill Ship Unfolds 'Pages of a History Book'
Star Bulletin, 9 May 2009
Scientists aboard the JOIDES Resolution are unlocking the earth's life story with sediment recovered from far beneath the Pacific ocean floor.
The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program ship arrived Monday with core samples that date back in time to the warmest sustained "greenhouse" period on Earth — about 53 million years ago. more

A research expedition begins to wrap
Scientific American, 26 April 2009
SOMEWHERE IN THE MID-PACIFIC I just came back inside from watching the rig floor crew trip pipe—that is, go through the process of extracting the over four kilometers (2.5 miles) of drill string that hung beneath the ship as we drilled the final hole at the final site (U1336B, for those keeping score). more

Ocean Drilling: How the Past Can Provide Clues to our Planet's Future Climate
Popular Mechanics, 3 April 2009
On a remote patch of ocean 1250 miles southwest of Hawaii, the crew of the scientific drilling ship JOIDES Resolution have lowered a massive drill bit through 3 miles of pipe to the seafloor below. By pulling cores of ancient ooze from beneath the ocean floor, scientists hope to learn how the Earth responded to climate change 50 million years ago—and how it may react to future warming. more

Scientists plan to drill climate secrets from Pacific sediment
PlanetEarth, 9 March 2009
An international team of scientists is set to sail to the equatorial Pacific to recover a continuous record of climate conditions over the last 55 million years. The researchers plan to drill sediment cores at a succession of eight sites that once lay on the equator. more

U-M, other scientists seek Pacific climate data
Chicago Tribune, 5 March 2009
An international expedition sets out from Honolulu next week to drill deep holes in the Pacific Ocean floor in search of clues about the past and future of our planet. The research vessel Joides Resolution makes two nine-week trips this year as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. more

Global Cooling Formed Glaciers in Antarctica: A massive CO2 drop also played a part
Softpedia, 27 February 2009
According to climate change models covering the Ancient history of the Earth, the Antarctic became covered with the ice sheets it's losing today some 33.5 million years ago, when the overall climate cooled significantly and the planet got converted from a greenhouse to an "ice house." In the February 27th issue of the journal Science, a team of researchers offers new insight into the changes that affected the global climate and eventually led to the relatively rapid transformation of the Antarctic into an ice field. more

CO2 Drop Caused Greenhouse-To-Icehouse Shift
redOrbit, 27 February 2009
A team of Yale geologists has a new perspective on the greenhouse-to-icehouse shift where global climate changed from an ice-free world to one with massive ice sheets in the Antarctic nearly 34 million years ago. The study, which is detailed in the February issue of Science, disproves a long-held theory that massive ice growth was accompanied by very little global temperature change. more

Spa-like seawater conditions 50 million years ago, scientists find
InSciences, 24 February 2009
If you lived in New Zealand 50 million years ago, you would have been able to enjoy a hot swim in the sea all year round, scientists have found. ... In a study that will be published in the international scientific journal Geology next month, scientists have inferred warm climate conditions in New Zealand for this time period from a wide range of fossil evidence, but until now the degree of warmth was uncertain. more

Project explores mechanics of major earthquake faults
Univ. Wisconsin-Madison, 15 February 2009
Deep-sea drilling into one of the most active earthquake zones on the planet is providing the first direct look at the geophysical fault properties underlying some of the world's largest earthquakes and tsunamis. more

A&M ship returns to sea
The Eagle, 2 February 2009
A scientific drilling ship that is part of Texas A&M University's largest research program has returned to the seas after a $115 million renovation.
The JOIDES Resolution left a Singapore shipyard last week to make its way to Honolulu. more

JOIDES Resolution is Back in Business
Marine Technology Reporter, 29 January 2009
Senior officials from the U.S. National Science Foundation and the U.S. Implementing Organization for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program recently marked the occasion of the research vessel JOIDES Resolution sailing off from Singapore for science sea trials and transit to Honolulu, after a complete transformation to modernize and upgrade the ship in a Singapore shipyard. more

U.S. Ocean Drilling Ship Returns to the Sea
ScienceInsider, 27 January 2009
The deep-sea scientific drilling ship JOIDES Resolution, the JR for short, has finally left the shipyards. The newly renovated vessel departed Singapore on Sunday, marking the end of an unprecedented 3-year hiatus in U.S. drilling. more

JOIDES Resolution Sails Again!
Deep-Sea News, 26 January 2009
The JOIDES Resolution, once workhorse of the deep sea scientific drilling research community, is currently at sea trials following a major overhaul. more

Ocean Treasure Stored at Texas A&M
Red Orbit, 9 January 2009
Priceless treasure from the bottom of the sea is locked away at Texas A&M University, stacked on floor-to-ceiling racks and kept secure in 15,000 square feet of refrigerated space. Although itÕs not gold bullion or precious gems, this treasure dazzles oceanographers, geologists, geophysicists and other geoscientists who come from around the world to College Station to sample it. more

School of Rock
Discovery News, 9 January 2009
The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Deep Earth Academy, and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership have announced their School of Rock for 2009 -- Cores, CORKS and Hydrology on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The "corks" part does not refer to red wine, nor will Jack Black will be teaching (sigh), but it sounds like a pretty fun week at sea for any science teachers interested to apply. more

2008

Methods of Ocean Drilling in Climate Research
ScienceDaily, 24 November 2008
The oceans are our climate regulators, cover the sites of fundamental geodynamic, geochemical and biological processes and have high-resolution records of the Earth's history in store for us. Scientific marine drilling and coring is crucial to cast light on both the deep and shallow (sub-) seafloors to advance our knowledge in the Earth and environmental sciences. more

Deep-Sea Scientific Drilling Hit By a Cost Double Whammy
Science, 24 October 2008
As the oil industry gears up for the ongoing offshore-oil boom, scientists who study the sea floor say competition for scarce drilling resources is leaving them high and dry. ÒFunding goes down, oil goes up,Ó laments paleoceanographer Henk Brinkhuis of Utrecht University in the Netherlands. more

Hispanic Business Announces 2008 EOY Winner's Circle Scholarship Recipients
HispanicBusiness.com, 29 September 2008
Hispanic Business Inc. has announced the recipients of the 2008 EOY Winner's Circle Scholarships, to be awarded at Hispanic Business' annual EOY event honoring entrepreneurial excellence... Ms. Padilla's participation in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Science Steering and Evaluation Panel in Potsdam, Germany solidified her career choice to become a scientist when she was able to witness first hand the opportunity to have her voice heard at an international forum. more

Study could help with Pacific earthquake preparation
El Defensor Chieftain, 16 August 2008
New Mexico Tech geophysics professor Dr. Glenn Spinelli has discovered that the area where earthquakes may occur off the coast of Washington and Oregon probably extends further inland than previously believed. Spinelli's research could impact estimates of the hazard due to ground shaking, and therefore earthquake preparedness plans for the cities of Seattle and Portland — and similar locations around the Pacific, where one tectonic plate moves under another. more

From Forests to Ice
Canada.com, June 2008
Extensive spruce forests used to cover the southern half of Greenland, according to a Canadian study that gives a remarkable glimpse of the icy island's green past and possible future. more

Inside the Tsunami Factory
Popular Science, May 2008
Over the past 1,300 years, the Nankai Trough, the 500-mile-long boundary between two tectonic plates off the southwestern coast of Japan, has been one of the world's most active tsunami hotspots. Now an international team of scientists has embarked on a multiyear project to drill four miles down into the heart of this subterranean wave machine. more

To the Core and Beyond
Lodi News Sentinel, 26 April 2008
As part of an elite group of scientists, Lodi native Michael Underwood is making history with a project that is drilling deep into the EarthÕs core. Discovering the secrets of the core may lead to earthquake forecasts and predictions, and may ultimately save thousands of lives. more

Global Warming and Antarctic Ice
CO2 Science, 2 April 2008
The authors used delta18O data, which are responsive to both temperature and salinity, that were derived from both surface- and bottom-dwelling foraminifera samples taken from a 40-m-thick core of laminated organic-carbon-rich marlstone retrieved from the western equatorial Atlantic Ocean at Ocean Drilling Program Site 1259... to infer variations in both sea surface temperature and global ice sheet volume during portions of the Turonian period of 93.5 to 89.3 million years ago. more

2007

Ocean-drilling vessel should soon be afloat again
Nature, 3 October 2007
Sir -- Those involved in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) are delighted by your encouragement of their work in your Editorial 'Drill often, drill deep' (Nature 449, 260; 2007) and News Feature 'Staying afloat' (Nature 449, 280; 2007). However, it is not correct to state that the IODP's US platform, the JOIDES Resolution, has languished at a shipyard since 2003. This research vessel completed 10 expeditions between June 2004 and December 2005, each with a full complement of scientists from the United States, Europe and Japan. more

School of Rock: Teacher studies sediment, sea floor
The Forecaster, 23 August 2007
Inside a 14,000-square-foot facility in the middle of sweltering southeast Texas are hundreds of miles of sea floor. The geological samples are kept at just above freezing, 40 degrees. This is home to the School of Rock, a summer program for teachers. more

Deep Drilling Unlocking PlanetÕs Secrets: Finding Facts Before Conclusions
AAPG EXPLORER, May 2007
The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is all about science. An international marine research drilling project, it is dedicated to advancing scientific understanding of the earth -- including but certainly not limited to a further understanding of global warming -- and to do so in a non-partisan, non-political way. more

2006

Earth's Climate Changes in Tune With Eccentric Orbital Rhythms
ScientificAmerican.com, 29 December 2006
Ocean sediment reveals the pattern behind the rise and fall of ice ages and the shape of Earth's orbit. more

Methane ices pose climate puzzle
BBC News, 13 December 2006
Scientists drilling ocean sediments off Canada have discovered methane ices at much shallower depths than expected. The finding has important implications for climate studies, they believe. more

Discovery could lead to mining of solid gas for fuel
The Guardian, 13 December 2006
The discovery of a mysterious solid form of natural gas off the east coast of Canada could bring one of Earth's biggest untapped sources of energy a step closer to commercial use, according to scientists. more

Shallow fuels bring bad news: Buried deposits of greenhouse gases may be more unstable than thought
Nature, 12 December 2006
Geologists have discovered underwater deposits of hydrates — icy deposits of frozen methane gas — at far shallower depths under the ocean floor than expected. The finding suggests that, in a globally warmed world, the hydrates could melt suddenly and release their gas into the atmosphere, thus warming the planet even more. more

Shallow Gas Hydrates Offer Mixed Bag
Discovery News, 12 December 2006
Deep-sea researchers have unearthed frozen mixtures of methane and ice — called gas hydrates — at surprisingly shallow depths in the Pacific Ocean. more

Eisknollen aus Wasser und Methan
Deutschlandfunk, 12 December 2006
Gashydrate oder Methanknollen am Meeresgrund gelten als wichtige Energiequelle der Zukunft. So richtig erforscht sind sie allerdings nicht, denn es ist schwierig, ihnen mit Bohrungen zu Leibe zu rücken. Jetzt hat ein groß angelegtes Bohrprogramm vollkommen unerwartete Ergebnisse gebracht, die auf der Herbsttagung der Amerikanischen Geophysikalischen Gesellschaft vorgestellt wurden. more [in German]

Geologist discusses global warming research
Appalachian State Uiversity News, 12 October 2006
Dr. Ken Miller will present a talk titled "The Phanerozoic Record of Global Sea-Level Change: ODP Constrains the Last 100 Million Years." His presentation is part of the U.S. Science Support Program's Joint Oceanographic Institutions Distinguished Lecturer Series and is sponsored by Appalachian's Department of Geology. more

Lucky find off Galapagos
EurekAlert!, 21 September 2006

Ocean Scientists Discover How Bacteria Produce Propane in the Deep Seafloor. During an expedition off the South American coast, an international team of ocean scientists discovered that the gases ethane and propane are widespread, and are being produced by microorganisms in deeply buried sediments. More

Frozen methane could be boon or disaster
Nunatsiaq News, 21 September 2006
Ice that burns? Such ice exists, and it may soon provide the world with a vast amount of fuel - or its melting may speed up climate change and increase Arctic temperatures to tropical levels not seen for 55 million years. more

Frozen fuel find rewrites rule book
Royal Society of Chemistry, 23 August 2006
Earth scientists are revising their ideas about natural gas hydrates after discovering that large deposits of the water and methane mixture can form at surprisingly shallow depths below the sea floor. more

Drilling Into Fossil Magma Chamber Deep Under the Ocean
Biology-blog.com, 11 August 2006
Researchers aboard the research drilling ship JOIDES Resolution have, for the first time, drilled into a fossil magma chamber under intact ocean crust. There, 1.4 kilometers beneath the sea floor, they have recovered samples of gabbro: a hard, black rock that forms when molten magma is trapped beneath Earth's surface and cools slowly. more

Korea Now Scientific Ocean-Drilling Member
The Korea Times, 5 July 2006
South Korea has become the 21st member of an international organization committed to scientific ocean drilling research, raising hope for the nation to make progress in the oceanic science field, the government said Wednesday. more

Science of global warming
Providence Journal (editorial), 23 June 2006
The Arctic expedition (supported by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, an international partnership of scientists and research institutions) has helped scientists understand that a natural eruption of greenhouse gases caused the planetary warm-up during what they call the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum. more

Earth is hottest now in 2,000 years; humans responsible for much of the warming
Associated Press, 23 June 2006
For all but the most recent 150 years, the academy scientists relied on "proxy" evidence from tree rings, corals, glaciers and ice cores, cave deposits, ocean and lake sediments, boreholes and other sources. more

Rock samples provide insight into Earth's history
The (Texas A&M) Battalion, 22 June 2006
Rock samples taken from oceanic crust are the buried treasure of geologists' dreams. ... A team of scientists and researchers from organizations and universities throughout the world, including Texas A&M, struck geological gold when they drilled into a fossilized magma chamber. more

Experts hope rocks unravel Earth's secrets
Associated Press, 18 June 2006
"I would say this is just like a voyage of discovery to the planet Mars, except this is inner space rather than outer space," said Neil Banerjee, staff scientist for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program at Texas A&M. "We're learning about the fundamental dynamics of how our planet works." more

"Changing Earth" report
CNN, 18 June 2006
Two years ago an international team of scientists set out to uncover the original makeup of the Arctic Ocean, what they found was anything but expected. The team, known as the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, drilled down to take rock samples from below the seafloor.

New Data on Earth's Climate History
NPR, 2 June 2006
New data obtained from an Arctic drilling expedition indicates that about 49 million years ago, the Arctic was green, with fresh surface water and ferns covering the water—at least during the summer months. The finding, researchers say, indicates that they may have seriously underestimated the power of greenhouse gases to warm Arctic areas. more

Scientists say Arctic once was tropical
Associated Press, 1 June 2006
Scientists have found what might have been the ideal ancient vacation hotspot with a 74-degree Fahrenheit average temperature, alligator ancestors and palm trees. It's smack in the middle of the Arctic. more

Sediment core hold secrets of Arctic climate
Reuters News Service, 1 June 2006
Sediment drilled from the floor beneath the Arctic Ocean holds prehistoric climate records that show Arctic temperatures reached subtropical levels about 55 million years ago, according to research reported on Wednesday. more

Studies portray tropical Arctic in distant past
Blog Espen, 1 June 2006
The first detailed analysis of an extraordinary climatic and biological record from the seabed near the North Pole shows that 55 million years ago the Arctic Ocean was much warmer than scientists imagined—a Floridian year-round average of 74 degrees. more

Polar core is hot stuff
Nature.com, 31 May 2006
more (requires subscription or registration)

Arctic Once Felt Like Florida, Studies Say
The New York Times 31 May 2006
more (requires subscription or registration)

Arctic's tropical past uncovered
BBC News 31 May 2006
Fifty-five million years ago the North Pole was an ice-free zone with tropical temperatures, according to research. more

Study Reveals Ancient Arctic Climate Swings
LiveScience.com, 31 May 2006
Scientists have uncovered the Arctic region's history of climate change buried beneath layers of ocean ice from a newly collected sediment core. more

Tropical Arctic? Scientists say it was hot 55 million years ago
Scripps Howard News Service, 30 May 2006
Sediment samples taken from a unique drilling expedition in the center of the Arctic Ocean appear to have solved a major mystery about Earth's climate over the last 50 million years. more

Scientist at Work | Douglas Wilson
With Time Running Out, a Discovery Deep in the Crust of the Earth

The New York Times, 16 May 2006
It was not exactly a journey to the center of the earth. But if it succeeded, it would take geologists through the earth's crust for the first time ever. more (requires subscription or registration)

Fish Teeth Reveal When Atlantic and Pacific Oceans United
Meryl.met, 3 May 2006
Scientists studying ancient fish teeth have now proposed that the passageway where the Pacific and Atlantic oceans join began opening around 41 million years ago, much earlier than originally estimated. more

Drill digs deeper than ever into Earth's crust
New Scientist, 29 April 2006
SINCE the 1950s, people have dreamed of drilling through the Earth's crust to the mantle. We are now a step closer, having reached the "gabbro" layer of oceanic crust for the first time. more

Ocean crust is giving up its secrets
Santa Barbara News Press, April 21, 2006
A hole drilled deep below the Pacific Ocean is helping a UCSB scientist and colleagues learn how ocean crust forms.

Drilled Core Exposes Hitherto Unseen Layer of Earth's Crust
Scientific American, 21 April 2006
Since the 1950s, scientists have been trying to drill through the oceanic crust to expose the mantle below. Although that goal remains out of reach—the crust is more than four miles thick—a new drilling project at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean has reached almost a mile below the sea-floor and exposed what lies beneath the uppermost layer of crust for the first time. more

Scientists Find the Elusive Gabbro
LiveScience.com, 20 April 2006
Scientists onboard the drilling ship JOIDES Resolution in the Pacific Ocean, about 500 miles west of Costa Rica, bored into the planet's crust and recovered black rocks called gabbro from intact crust. more

Drillers Hit Deep-Sea Pay Dirt
ScienceNOW Daily News, 20 April 2006
Marine geologist Douglas Wilson of the University of California, Santa Barbara, and colleagues from three expeditions of the drill ship JOIDES Resolution report that they finally hit gabbro last December. more (requires subscription or registration)

Fire in Ice
Popular Mechanics, April 2006
Natural gas locked up in methane hydrates could be the world's next great energy source—if engineers can figure out how to extract it safely. more

Ocean hot in days of dinosaurs, study finds
Scripps Howard News Service, 17 February 2006
Sometimes we make that first dash into the ocean on summer vacation and happily announce, "It's warm as bathwater." But a new study based on ancient sediments collected off South America indicates that the tropical Atlantic Ocean really did hit temperatures as high as 107 degrees Fahrenheit back when dinosaurs ruled.

Deep-Sea Drill Set for Climate Research
Associated Press, 28 January 2006
The CHIKYU is studded with superlatives. Completed last year, the ship houses the world's biggest deep-sea drill, sports a high-tech floating laboratory and boasts a $500 million price tag. more

Ancient Global Warming Flipped Ocean Circulation, May Do So Again
Environment News Service, 5 January 2006
In today's issue of the journal "Nature," scientists Flavia Nunes and Richard Norris describe how they examined a four to seven degree warming period that occurred some 55 million years ago during the closing stages of the Paleocene and the beginning of the Eocene eras. more

Upgrade aims to put drill ship at cutting edge
Nature, 5 January 2006
After 20 years as the flagship of scientific ocean drilling, the JOIDES Resolution is taking a holiday. The ship is heading to dry dock for what its operators describe as an "extreme makeover".

2005

Scientific Drill Ship to Be Reborn
Science, 23 December 2005
CALIFORNIA--The JOIDES Resolution ends its 20-year career as the world's lone deep-sea scientific drilling ship next week. But the National Science Foundation (NSF) hopes that $115 million will bring her back into the water, better than ever. more

Ocean Drilling Takes Teacher to New Depths: Hoover science teacher spends two weeks at sea
The [Potomac, MD] Almanac, 2 November 2005
MARSTELLER and 12 other educators from around the country joined the ship's resident scientists and engineers for a collaborative expedition dubbed the "School of Rock" beginning Oct. 31. more

Scientists to study drill cores
Times Colonist (Victoria, British Columbia), 1 November 2005
The 143-metre exploration vessel JOIDES Resolution has returned to port with 1,200 metres of muddy drill cores pulled out of the seafloor off Vancouver Island's west coast.

Arctic Ocean ridge yields clues that tell of warm past
Anchorage Daily News (Alaska), 30 October 2005
From the depths of a long ridge spanning the floor of the Arctic Ocean, researchers have pulled up evidence of a plant that now grows in rice fields in Vietnam. This suggests that the top of the world was once a very warm place. more

Corvallis teacher goes to sea
Corvallis Gazette-Times, 28 October 2006
When the research ship JOIDES Resolution leaves Victoria, British Columbia, next week, a Corvallis science teacher and 12 other educators will join scientists from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program for a 16-day ocean-going teacher education expedition nicknamed the "School of Rock." more

Expedition drills deep in study of climate issues
Times Colonist (Victoria, British Columbia), 17 October 2005
Just off the coast of Vancouver Island, a ship that looks more like an oil rig is digging deep beneath the ocean floor, unearthing chunks of ice that could tell scientists about climate change, landslides and even the next tsunami.

Paleoclimatology: A Record from the Deep
NASA, October 2005
Clad in a hard hat and steel-toe boots, paleoceanographer Jerry McManus strides onto the deck of the JOIDES Resolution, staring through the steel rigging that supports the shipÕs drilling equipment at the brilliant star-studded sky. Here, in the middle of the ocean, city lights do not dim the night sky, and the clear view is spectacular. McManus, an associate scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, has just completed another 12-hour shift in one of the ship's six science labs, where he has been analyzing samples of the sea floor to glean bits of evidence about past climates. more

Familiar research vessel back in Astoria
The Daily Astorian, 19 September 2005
The JOIDES (Joint Oceanographic Institutions Deep Earth Sampling) Resolution returned to Astoria last week and is getting ready for a scientific research mission off Vancouver Island, Canada. more

Drilling to The Core
Newsweek International Edition, 12 September 2005
In Jules Verne's classic 19th-century novel "Journey to the Center of the Earth," Professor Lidenbrock travels to a mysterious subterranean world. Now a Japanese ship is aiming to replicate his adventure, striking out on its own quest to explore the earth's depths. In August, the massive 57,000-metric-ton Chikyu ("Earth"), a cutting-edge deep-sea drilling vessel, left Nagasaki on a test run. more

Scientists studying lava under the ocean that shaped Earth's climate
Knight Ridder, 25 August 2005
Scientists on drill ships are studying colossal slabs of volcanic lava under the sea that shaped its climate, helped determine its life forms and record Earth's violent past. They think their research can help explain what's happening to our warming world today.

Getting to the Core of Climate Change
University of Florida, 23 August 2005
"The scenario of an abrupt climate change suddenly affecting us in a short period of time is not science fiction, that could happen," says Geology Professor Jim Channell. As a member of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program—an international consortium made up of scientists from America, Europe and Japan—Channell recently co-led a two-month drilling expedition off the coast of Greenland to gather sediment samples from the floor of the North Atlantic. more

Underwater Sand Avalanches Linked To Sea-Level Changes In Gulf Of Mexico
Science Daily, 20 July 2005
New evidence has been found linking underwater catastrophic sand avalanches to rapid sea-level changes in deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, according to marine geologists affiliated with the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). more

Expedition 304/305 interview with Jay Miller on NPR's Science Friday segment.
NPR, 2 May 2005
WeÕll check in with the leader of a journey to the center of the EarthÑwell, almost. A several-month-long expedition aimed at drilling deep into the ocean floor recently ended. WeÕll talk about the deep geology of the planet, and why scientists want to find their Moho. audio

Hole Drilled to Bottom of Earth's Crust, Breakthrough to Mantle Looms
Live Science, 7 April 2005
Scientist said this week they had drilled into the lower section of Earth's crust for the first time and were poised to break through to the mantle in coming years. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) seeks the elusive "Moho," a boundary formally known as the Mohorovicic discontinuity. It marks the division between Earth's brittle outer crust and the hotter, softer mantle. more

2004

Deep Drilling at Sea
Science News for Kids, 8 September 2004
Beakers and chemical bottles sit on shelves, just like in a normal science lab. High-powered microscopes, incubators for growing bacteria, and other equipment line the room, just like in a normal science lab. more

Drilling for Knowledge
Earth Radio, 30 August 2004
A new, international ocean drilling program boldly goes where no drill has gone before. more

Venture drills water from rock
The Daily Astorian, June 28, 2004
The JOIDES Resolution left Astoria Sunday on an expedition to learn more about a part of our world that, while right in our backyard, we know less about than the moon or Mars. more

New clues to Earth's magnetic flip-flops
CNN.com, 7 April 2004
Next time Earth's magnetic field flips, compass needles will point South instead of North. But scientists can't say when it will occur, and until now they've disagreed on how long the transitions take. more

Quick flip of Earth's magnetic field revealed
NewScientist.com, 7 April 2004
The Earth's magnetic field takes an average of only 7000 years to reverse its polarity, but the switch happens much more quickly near the equator, according to the most comprehensive study yet of the last four reversals. more

Scientists plan extensive sampling of ocean beds
KnightRidder, 3 March 2004
In a new research program getting under way this summer, ship-board scientists will punch thousands of holes in the ocean bottom and take samples from greater depths than ever before. They will be investigating the biology, chemistry and physics of "inner space," as they call the vast world hidden beneath the seas.